Finished Object Friday: Project Peace Cowl 2016

It’s with a sigh of relief that I can blog about FINALLY finishing this cowl! It started out as what I thought would be a quick knit but alas, a combination of life & a bit of boredom with the knit, combined with the fact that I was working with a 318 stitch pattern with sock yarn made it take a little while.

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All things aside, I’m pretty happy with how it turned out.  It will replace a cowl that I had the misfortune of misplacing before the end of 2016. Pretty happy with the stitch definition.  The pattern itself works well with variegated sock yarn, which is always a plus.

Get the pattern here: Project Peace 2016 Cowl

 

 

Work in Progress Wednesday: Project Peace 2016 Cowl

Here’s my current work-in-progress for the Project Peace knit-a-long cowl with a waffle stitch pattern:

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The yarn I’m working with is a skein that I received from a yarn swap: Nina Hand Dyed Yarns Tweed Sock in the Fire colorway.  It’s been a part of my stash for several years.  I love variegated yarns but my experience has been mixed with them. I try to be careful with the pattern I pick for them.  However, I’m happy with this skein as it seems to work with the pattern well. I’m in love with how the reds, oranges, and browns look with the yarn.

Monday Musings: Knitting Mistakes Inject Peace Into My Life

Last week, I joined The Healthy Knitter‘s knit-a-long, called Project Peace:

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Project Peace is a knit-a-long (or in this case, a peace-a-long) with a waffle stitch-esque pattern cowl… for the purposes of thinking of peace.  From the Ravelry page:

What’s a peace-along? There will be a daily tip on how to infuse more peace into your life. These tips will be available on my blog each day from December 1-21. They’ll be simple things, some from me and others from a few guests.

With little time to knit lately & with my commitment to knitting blankets for hospice patients, I thought that a knit-a-long where I’m expect to knit 1 4-row round a day was perfect.  I’ve got a hectic line to the finish of 2016 with my academic career coming to an end after December 16, work ramping up, & a trip to the Philippines planned on December 21st.  I’ll be gone for over 2 weeks.

I found the idea of using a knitting project to remind myself to “inject more peace into my life” very intriguing because I’m a bit type-A-ish in my life.  I often want to do too many things at once & I strive for perfection. However, one of things that knitting does for me is remind me to do what I can with the time that I have and that making a mistake in my project (or in my life) isn’t the end of the world.

This cowl is a great example.  When I started the cowl, I mis-read the pattern.  I realized that the first round was going to be wrong, as I had miscalculated the number of rounds that I would need for it. 1 round was going to be wrong. “Fuck,” I thought.

In the past, a mistake like that (even after casting on 318 stitches) would have meant me patiently ticking back every single stitch cast on using fingering weight yarn and re-working the round. I’ve had friends, two of them being yarn shop owners who are expert knitters, tell me that I was nuts for doing this on something like a cowl’s beginning round.  Why? It’s a place that no one would notice except for me. Yet I’d do it. Every time.

Until now, that is.

This time, I looked at it and remembered that I’m supposed to be putting more peace into my life & and thinking about concepts of peace within the world. I thought about how much of a bummer it would be to tick back all of those stitches.  I also considered how thankful I am that I don’t live in a wartime zone. Peace has an entirely different meaning in these parts of the world: a meaning that I couldn’t even begin to comprehend as someone with the ability and privilege to be able to participate in a knit-a-long with a peace theme.

Then I gave the cowl an honest look:

“Yeah,” I thought to myself.  “It’s fine. Make a note of what you did & if you want, just make your last round mirror the first one, so that the cowl looks like same.”

I moved on to the next round & continued to watch episodes of The West Wing & I didn’t think about it again. (Unless you count this blog post.)

Because if there’s anything that knitting has taught me, it’s this:

Life isn’t about the mistakes you make but how you handle them. It’s about moving on to the next round as gracefully as you can to get the job done.